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Hyde Park, Eastgate, Fairfield, Covington: +1-513-723-1600
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Hyde Park, Eastgate, Fairfield,
Covington:
+1-513-723-1600
Portsmouth:
+1-740-300-2022
Call For A No-Pressure, Free Consultation

Full Service Bankruptcy
And Debt-Relief Lawyers

Are more foreclosures on the horizon?

| Aug 26, 2020 | Bankruptcy, Foreclosure

The recent climate is extremely stressful for most Americans for several reasons; many citizens do not help a job, remain locked in their homes and struggle with the costs of living with limited or no income.

It puts most families in a dark position where they have to consider the future of their finances and their home. However, Congress did take steps to protect Americans from foreclosure for a specific period while the world returns to a normal state.

But as the deadline approaches, many citizens question whether politicians will continue to stop foreclosures or if we need to anticipate a flood of foreclosures on the horizon.

Bracing for the flood

According to DS News, there are predictions that over 200,000 homes next spring will land between the initial-foreclosure-notice phase and final resale by the lenders. There is also a possibility of over 500,000 foreclosures if congress cannot continue a moratorium on residential properties.

It puts many politicians in a tough position because extending the moratorium could lead to benefits and horrible consequences. For example, there are huge benefits for their voters as many Americans could stay in their homes and find another avenue to make up their mortgage costs. However, there is research to show that long-term moratoriums have significant damage to the overall economy.

The increase won’t be isolated to specific states either. Foreclosures will increase across the United States, with some regions predicted to almost double in foreclosures by spring 2021.

It puts many Americans in a position where they need to brace for the worst-case scenario. Luckily, bankruptcy can help certain families keep their homes while reducing their debt. But you should evaluate all your options before filing.

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